Searching over 5,500,000 cases.


searching
Buy This Entire Record For $7.95

Download the entire decision to receive the complete text, official citation,
docket number, dissents and concurrences, and footnotes for this case.

Learn more about what you receive with purchase of this case.

United States v. Kellogg

United States District Court, N.D. Alabama, Northeastern Division

January 22, 2015

UNITED STATES OF AMERICA,
v.
FRANKLIN LAMAR KELLOGG, Defendant/Movant.

MEMORANDUM OF OPINION AND ORDER

L. SCOTT COOGLER, District Judge.

Defendant, Franklin Lamar Kellogg ("Kellogg"), has filed two pro se motions pursuant to Federal Rule of Criminal Procedure 36 in which he requests the correction of alleged clerical errors in the written judgment on re-sentencing that was entered in this action on February 6, 2012. (Docs. 107 and 108.) For the following reasons, the motions are due to be denied.

I. Background

Kellogg was convicted by a jury in this Court on July 9, 2007, of one count of armed bank robbery, in violation of 18 U.S.C. § 2113(a) and (d) (Count 1); one count of knowingly using a firearm during and in relation to a crime of violence, in violation of 18 U.S.C. § 924(c)(1)(A) (Count 2); and one count of felon in possession of a firearm, in violation of 18 U.S.C. § 922(g)(1) (Count 3). He was sentenced on December 5, 2007, to the custody of the Bureau of Prisons to the maximum 300 months on Count 1; 660 months on Count 3 to run concurrently; and the mandatory-minimum 300 months on Count 2 to run consecutive to the other sentences, for a total sentence of 960 months' imprisonment. Kellogg was also sentenced to a term of supervised release of 60 months; ordered to pay a fine in the amount of $1950.00, and ordered to pay restitution in the amount of $9830.00. On December 6, 2007, the judgment was entered which reflected the aforementioned verdict and sentence.

After the Court granted in part Kellogg's petition to vacate his sentence pursuant to 28 U.S.C. § 2255, the Court vacated Kellogg's conviction on Count 3 of the indictment and vacated his 660 month sentence as calculated and imposed on that count alone. Kellogg was re-sentenced by this Court on February 2, 2012. Kellogg requested and was granted permission to proceed without the aid of an attorney at the re-sentencing, although the Court ordered Kellogg's appointed attorney to remain in a standby capacity. The Court pronounced at sentencing, and the written judgment entered February 6, 2012 reflects, that Kellogg was sentenced to a term of imprisonment for 960 months consisting of 300 months as to Count 1 and 660 months as to Count 2, with Count 2 to run consecutively to Count 1, and to a term of supervised release upon release from imprisonment for 60 months. Kellogg was also ordered to pay a fine of $1, 950.00 and restitution in the amount of $9, 830.00.

II. Discussion

In the first motion, Kellogg argues that pursuant to Rule 31 of the Federal Rules of Criminal Procedure, his written judgment should not state that he is to pay his restitution obligation "immediately" because he is not currently able to pay his restitution obligation. Kellogg states that at his sentencing hearing, the Court ordered that restitution was not to be paid until he was released from imprisonment.

In the second motion, Kellogg seeks to amend his first motion insofar as he is requesting relief pursuant to Rule 36 of the Federal Rules of Criminal Procedure, not Rule 31. Also in the second motion, Kellogg adds that his written judgment insofar as it orders him to pay the fine in the amount of $1, 950.00 does not reflect the Court's seizure of his automobile as payment towards the $1, 950.00 fine. Additionally, he states that the Court's oral pronouncement of the amount of his fine and of his restitution obligation at his sentencing hearing did not include interest as stated in the written judgment.

Rule 36 of the Federal Rules of Criminal Procedure provides, "After giving any notice it considers appropriate, the court may at any time correct a clerical error in a judgment, order, or other part of the record, or correct an error in the record arising from oversight or omission." Fed. R. Crim. P. 36. Rule 36 only allows for the correction of "clerical mistakes" and "may not be used to make a substantive alteration to a criminal sentence." United States v. Portillo, 363 F.3d 1161, 1164 (11th Cir. 2004) (internal quotations omitted). In Portillo, the Eleventh Circuit held that Rule 36 was the proper vehicle for the district court to correct a judgment to conform to the court's oral pronouncement at sentencing regarding a restitution order, noting that the mistake was clerical because it was "minor and mechanical" and "did not fundamentally alter Portillo's sentence." Id. at 1165. When a sentence pronounced orally and unambiguously conflicts with the written order of judgment, the oral pronouncement governs. See United States v. Khoury, 901 F.2d 975, 977 (11th Cir. 1990).

Although a motion pursuant to Rule 36 is the proper vehicle through which to request that a court correct a clerical mistake in a written judgment so that it conforms with the court's oral pronouncement at sentencing, Kellogg is not entitled to relief under Rule 36 on any of his arguments.

As to his first argument that the written judgment conflicts with the oral pronouncement of sentence with regard to whether his restitution obligation is due immediately, the record from the sentencing hearing forecloses the claim. At re-sentencing, Kellogg stated that he objected to the imposition of restitution because he "do[es] not have the ability to pay either the restitution or the fine, the conditions in the prisons with the economy and all, I don't make as much." (Doc. 97 at 23.) He also reiterated that he would like the Court to consider his "inability to pay, not having any funds as far as the restitution is concerned also." (Doc. 97 at 25.) The Court overruled Kellogg's objection, stating:

With regard to the request that the restitution order, the restitution order take into account the defendant's inability to pay, I already do that and I recognize that restitution is going to have to be paid out over time, but the defendant is obviously a smart individual as he has demonstrated today and I believe will be capable of obtaining gainful employment once he is released from prison. And I believe that then he will be able to work out a payment schedule to pay those amounts and restitution.

(Doc. 97 at 29.) The Court then orally pronounced a restitution obligation, stating: "Restitution in the amount of $9, 830 previously ordered, will continue to be ordered, in the amount and as to the recipients and the terms as previously stated in the judgment previously entered by this Court." (Doc. 97 at 29.) The written judgment entered several days later states that "[r]estitution is due and payable immediately, " but it also provides that: "[u]pon release from imprisonment, any remaining balance shall be paid in monthly installments during the period of supervision in accordance with the financial guidelines previously approved by the court for use in this district and administered by the probation office." (Doc. 89.)

Contrary to Kellogg's argument, while the Court took into account that in all likelihood Kellogg would not be able to pay his restitution obligation until he was released from prison and then according to the terms of a payment plan, the Court never indicated at sentencing that restitution would not be due immediately. As there is thus no conflict between the record at ...


Buy This Entire Record For $7.95

Download the entire decision to receive the complete text, official citation,
docket number, dissents and concurrences, and footnotes for this case.

Learn more about what you receive with purchase of this case.