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Bennett v. Jefferson County

United States District Court, N.D. Alabama, Southern Division

September 30, 2014

ANDREW BENNETT; RODERICK
v.
ROYAL; MARY MOORE; JOHN W. ROGERS; WILLIAMR. MUHAMMAD; CARLYNR. CULPEPPER; FREDDIE H. JONES, II; SHARON OWENS; REGINALD THREADGILL; RICKEY DAVIS, JR.; ANGELINA BLACKMON; SHARON RICE; DAVID RUSSELL, Appellants,
v.
JEFFERSON COUNTY, ALABAMA, Appellee. Bankruptcy No. 11-05736-TBB9

MEMORANDUM OPINION

SHARON LOVELACE BLACKBURN, District Judge.

This case is before the court on the Motion for Partial Dismissal filed by appellee Jefferson County, Alabama, (doc. 4), [1] and Motion to Consolidate, (doc. 14), and Motion to Strike, (doc. 15), filed by appellants - Andrew Bennett; Roderick V. Royal; Mary Moore; John W. Rogers; William R. Muhammad; Carlyn R. Culpepper; Freddie H. Jones, II; Sharon Owens; Reginald Threadgill; Rickey Davis, Jr.; Angelina Blackmon; Sharon Rice; and David Russell (hereinafter "the Ratepayers"). The Ratepayers have appealed the bankruptcy court's confirmation of the County's Chapter 9 Plan, as well as certain other orders in related adversary proceedings. For the reasons below, the court finds that the County's Motion for Partial Dismissal, (doc. 4), is due to be granted in part and denied in part, and the Ratepayers' Motion to Strike, (doc. 15), and their Motion to Consolidate, (doc. 14), are due to be denied.

I. MOTION TO STRIKE

The Ratepayers, pursuant to Rule 12(f) of the Federal Rules of Civil Procedure and Rule 7012 of the Federal Rules of Bankruptcy Procedure, ask the court to strike the County's Motion for Partial Dismissal. (Doc. 15 at 2.) Rule 12(f) allows a court to strike "from a pleading an insufficient defense or any redundant, immaterial, impertinent, or scandalous matter." Fed.R.Civ.P. 12(f). Rule 7012 is inapplicable because the Rules of Part VII of the Federal Rules of Bankruptcy Procedure govern only adversary proceedings, and an appeal from the bankruptcy court is not an adversary proceeding. See Fed.R.Bankr.P. 7001. The Ratepayers do not contend that the County's Motion for Partial Dismissal is "a pleading, " or that it is "redundant, immaterial, impertinent, or scandalous." Rather, they assert that the Motion is premature and "legally unsupportable, " and that the "Bankruptcy Rules do not allow a preemptive strike on appellants' opening brief." (Doc. 15 at 3-4.)

The court disagrees. Indeed, the Eleventh Circuit has affirmed the practice of deciding a motion to dismiss an appeal on mootness grounds before addressing the merits. See, e.g., In re Seidler, 44 F.3d 945, 947 (11th Cir. 1995). Therefore, the Ratepayers' Motion to Strike, (doc. 15), will be denied.

II. MOTION FOR PARTIAL DISMISSAL

A. FACTS AND CLAIMS OF THE RATEPAYERS[2]

In a Memorandum Opinion entered in 2012, the bankruptcy court set forth the following facts:

The origins of Jefferson County, Alabama's bankruptcy case are both recent in vintage and far removed from the filing date of its chapter 9 case on November 9, 2011. Two major factors precipitating its bankruptcy are crushing debt and the loss of a large part of its tax revenues that were not earmarked for specific purposes.
...
The far removed precipitating factor is also partly one of recent vintage. It is a debt load well in excess of $4, 000, 000, 000.00. The majority of this debt is directly attributable to massive borrowing in the form of warrants issued from 1997 to 2003 to finance the construction and repair of a sewer system owned by the County.... The aggregate of the warrants issued between 1997 and 2003 is $3, 685, 150, 000.00 and the unpaid principal balance is around $3, 200, 000, 000.00.
Part of the sewer related debt involves a complex and failed combination of swap and interest rate stabilization agreements. Simplistically and at the behest of former county commissioners, the County believed it could lower the interest on warrants by shifting from fixed rates to adjusting ones.
...
Superficially, the indebtedness caused by the sewer system construction and repair might appear to be only a relatively recent set of events. It is not. Why it is not is that sewer systems in the state of disrepair of those the County had and added to did not get to their level of disrepair over just the course of a few years or a few decades. Absent some catastrophic event, it took upwards of a century of neglect by the County and the other municipal governments from which the County acquired twenty some sewer systems. The many decades of failing to properly maintain these sewer systems is the farther in time factor.
...
Ironically, it is the structure of the debt incurred to finance the sewer system upgrades and repairs that has prevented its costs from being spread onto all of the individuals and businesses located in the County. It is also this structure that makes it highly unlikely that the value - not the gross amount - of what was loaned can ever be fully repaid.
The structure is warrants. Not warrants that are general obligations, repayment of which could come from general revenues of the County. Rather, the County utilized special revenue warrants making the revenues of the sewer system the sole source of repayment of the warrant debt. Conceptually, it is this limited source of repayment that keeps the inhabitants of the local governments paying for the failures of their localities to maintain their sewer systems.... Why these costs cannot be directly imposed on all of the inhabitants of the County is the limited source of repayment of the sewer system debt.
...
Under the security documents, the warrant holders possess a lien that is first in priority and the ability of the County to borrow more monies is subject to rights accorded the warrant holders under the lending documents.
Over time, special revenue warrants have been utilized for project financing on a greater and greater scale and have become for some municipalities the exclusive means of borrowing for projects such as water systems, sewer systems and other wants and needs. Why this has occurred will vary from location and time of projects. However, all have certain characteristics that make them attractive to municipalities. In many states, special revenue warrants do not require a vote by the citizens of the municipality, while bonds frequently do. This is the case for Jefferson County.[3] Another commonality is that special revenue warrants are not counted as debt for indebtedness limits imposed by states on its municipalities.[4] This, too, is the case in Alabama. A third is that many states do not allow municipalities to encumber their properties with liens that could be enforced by foreclosure or repossession of the properties. Yet again, this is a feature Alabama shares with other states.
Notwithstanding lawyers, judges, politicians and those in the business of selling the means of financing for municipalities - who see these three common characteristics through a lens clouded by legal niceties, private preferences, and money making - the reality is that two are not true from an economic perspective. When one understands that for any capital project its value over a useful life span equates to the revenues it generates, the granting of a lien on the revenue stream for decades is not from an economist's view much different than having a lien on the capital good. Accentuating this economic viewpoint is the appointment of the Receiver for the County's sewer system with the sole authority to operate and control it for potentially decades, if not its useful life.[5] This is not much different than a foreclosure or repossession. It effectively strips the County from control of its property and, if it lasts long enough, from the aggregate value of what is the sewer system.
In a similar vein, the concept that special revenue warrant financing is not a debt of the County may be accurate from a certain legal perspective.[6] It is misguided and wrong in the realm of financial matters. This case is an example of why. When sewer usage charges increase beyond a point, the ability of the County to obtain revenue from other sources for other purposes is constrained. Despite the fact that the County has not pledged its full faith and credit for the payment of these warrants, this form of debt still indirectly impairs its ability to borrow and tax. At the point now reached by the County, the payment of increasing sewer charges takes monies from its residents that might otherwise have been available via taxes, assessments, fees, or other means. It also has caused the County to use non-sewer revenues and County properties to subsidize some costs and expenses attributable to the sewer system which have not been fully reimbursed from sewer system revenues.[7] These indirect effects are some of what states wanted their municipalities to avoid when they imposed debt limits on them: excessive borrowing that impairs municipal governments from getting monies via taxes, fees, or otherwise for other purposes and dedicating properties and monies to debt service that might be better used elsewhere.
The one correct common factor is that the special revenue warrant financing has reduced, if not avoided, input from all of the inhabitants of the County. No vote by the inhabitants of the County was required for the special revenue warrant financing. For those in the business of selling such financing and those desirous of building projects, this may be good, but for those who have to pay, it is not such a good thing when done in excess.
Excess is clearly what occurred with the County's special revenue warrant financing for the sewer system. Many causes for this excess have been presented to the Court. They include graft and fraud by former county commissioners and county employees; in particular, former county commissioners who headed the department overseeing the sewer system and certain of the department's top personnel.[8] All of them have been found or plead guilty on federal bribery and related charges for obtaining monies and other benefits from contractors hired to build parts of the sewer system.
Not to be outdone by the public sector is the business sector. Here, numerous businesses and individuals who were officers, owners, or employees of businesses doing the construction work for the sewer system were charged with crimes including fraud and bribery associated with their work for the County. Just as with the former county commissioners and county employees, some plead guilty and others were convicted. So far, the total of public and private persons and entities determined to have committed crimes related to the County's sewer system is somewhere in the low twenties.[9]
Those involved in investment banking and municipal finance were not out of the loop when it came to dishonest or inappropriate conduct. Some of those involved in the development and sales of the types of financial instruments used in part by the County for its sewer system's needs have committed crimes related to what was sold to the County. Others have not been charged with crimes, but have entered settlements with the United States Securities and Exchange Commission where there is no admission of wrongdoing, but payments in the tens of millions of dollars have been made.
...
Starting with the first indenture (the Indenture) dated as of February 1, 1997, by and between the County and the Indenture Trustee, and through the course of eleven supplemental indentures, the County agreed to payment terms and secured payment of the warrants issued by it. Initially, the warrants bore fixed rates. By 2001, though, and continuing into 2003, the County issued variable rate and auction rate warrants. Both put the County at risk of interest rate fluctuations. [Footnote omitted.]
...
By February 2008, various defaults under the Indenture and the warrants had occurred and continued. In April 2008, the County was unable to make principal payments due on certain of the warrants. Between April of 2008 and August of that year, forbearance agreements were entered involving the County and representatives of warrant holders, among others. Unable to resolve matters with the County, the Indenture Trustee and others filed suit in September 2008, in the United States District Court for the Northern District of Alabama against the County and its then commissioners. The case is styled The Bank of New York Mellon, et al. v. Jefferson County, Alabama, et al., Case No. 2:08-CV-01703-RDP. Since the remedies sought in this federal case are substantially the same as those of a subsequent Alabama state court case, a detailed rendition of them is not given. It is sufficient to point out that one was the appointment of a receiver for the County's sewer system which was opposed by the County.
...
Although the District Court Judge determined in June 2009, that there was justification for appointment of a receiver, he abstained from this request based on the Johnson Act, 28 U.S.C. ยง 1342, [10] not allowing federal appointment of a receiver with rate setting authority. [ See Bank of N.Y. Mellon v. Jefferson County, 2009 U.S. Dist. LEXIS 122093 (N.D. Ala. June 12, 2009).] This was one of the Indenture Trustee's most desired functions for the sought after receiver. The abstention order was entered on June 12, 2009, for the receivership portion of the complaint and the residual portions of the requested relief were not decided.
...
In order to obtain a receiver with rate setting power for the sewer system, the Indenture Trustee initiated suit in the Circuit Court of Jefferson County, Alabama on August 3, 2009, in the case captioned The Bank of New York Mellon, as Indenture Trustee v. Jefferson County, Alabama, et al., case number CV 2009-02318. Also named defendants in this suit were the then Jefferson County Commissioners. In this state court proceeding, the Indenture Trustee again sought appointment of a receiver for the County's sewer system, an accounting for the sewer system's revenues, mandamus against the county commissioners and prohibition against the county commissioners and the County regarding certain aspects of the operations of the sewer system, and a judgment for unpaid monies owed warrant holders.
Partially due to the absence of any dispute that the County had breached the terms of the Indenture and the warrants by both non-monetary and monetary defaults, the Alabama court judge granted partial summary judgment in favor of the Indenture Trustee by an order entered on September 22, 2010 (hereinafter "the Receiver Order"). By this order, John S. Young, Jr., LLC, a Delaware limited liability company, was appointed receiver for the County's sewer system and the Indenture Trustee was awarded a judgment of $515, 942, 500.11 against the County. Collection of the judgment is expressly limited to revenues available under the Indenture's terms to pay the sewer system indebtedness.
...
Specific findings by the Alabama receivership court regarding the County and its sewer system are that the warrant holders have been harmed by the loss of sewer system revenues that resulted in lowering the amount of monies available for payment of the warrants by (i) not increasing sewer system usage rates as required by the Indenture, and (ii) not operating the sewer system in an "economical, efficient and proper manner." More pointedly, the County did not timely and sufficiently increase customer sewer rates and failed to collect monies from sewer customers some of whom/which the County did not even know were using the sewer system. Other issues were excessive staffing and the County diverting sewer system monies for unauthorized purposes such as paying other, non-sewer related County expenses. The repercussion of all of these and other failures by the County was to decrease monies available to pay the warrants.
...
Important for consideration now are those [portions of the Receiver Order] that demonstrate what was done by the Receiver Order and what was not done. There is no doubt that the only purpose of the receivership is to force compliance with the terms of the Indenture as was requested by the Indenture Trustee.... It is an order giving a private creditor a contracted for and statutory remedy to enforce portions of the indentures and warrants designed to protect interests of the warrant holders because the County had failed to do what was required of it under the terms of the loan documents.
Exclusive possession, custody and control of the sewer system along with certain non-sewer system properties and the exclusive authority to operate the sewer system was given to the Receiver. The Receiver was also granted the authority to fix and charge sewer rates, collect the system's revenues, pay its bills, implement operational efficiencies and other revenue increasing measures, and a cadre of other rights and abilities designed to increase the revenues payable to the warrant holders be it from increased sewer rates, obtaining monies from other sources, or decreasing costs.
The Receiver was denied authority without some future "express order of [the Alabama receivership court] to sell or otherwise dispose" of the sewer system or any part of it. Likewise, the Receiver Order does not alter the ownership and title to the sewer system properties. All remain owned by and titled in the County.... [A]nother paragraph of the Receiver Order delineat[es] that the Receiver owes duties to the sewer system and the Court, not to the County, the Indenture Trustee, or others.
...
The evidence indicates that the Receiver has done a much better job during his tenure than was done by the County during the tenures of its former county commissioners.
...
The one thing the Receiver has not accomplished is one of the most important to the Indenture Trustee: further increases in sewer usage rates.
...
During the receivership period of a little over a year before the chapter 9 [proceeding was filed], the Receiver acted as a go between in the efforts by the County, the Indenture Trustee, insurers of payments of certain of the warrants, banks providing liquidity to the parties, and others to resolve the sewer system related debts of the County. To that end, it appeared in mid 2011 that a compromise had been reached that would have reduced the warrant indebtedness to somewhere around $2, 200, 000, 000.00 and involved the refinancing of the remaining debt.
On September 16, 2011, the Jefferson County Commission approved a term sheet with the Receiver establishing the framework for a settlement with its sewer system related creditors. The perceived settlement was never finalized.
...
There is evidence that the new commissioners are willing to take unpopular stances and undertake certain actions that might be contrary to their best political interests when it comes to re-election. One is that as part of the term sheet framework they agreed to rate increases of 8.2% per year for three years commencing on November 1, 2011, followed by up to 3.25% per year increases for what is an untold number of years. This is despite the fact that the average sewer rates increased over 300% since 1997 and would increase by a further 527% based on rates desired by the Indenture Trustee. These sorts of increases would take the average monthly residential sewer bill of $63.00 per month up to above $360.00 per month under the Indenture Trustee's wishes. Recognizing the economic and legal limits on what rate increases could be made, the Receiver studied both the structure of the rates and the ability of users to pay increased rates. Its conclusion was an immediate 25% rate increase was justifiable with another 25% in a year achievable along with other yearly increases for the future. As is evident, none of the scenarios regarding rate increases is pleasant for those who must pay them, or for those who must thereafter face the voters.[11]
...
Perhaps the most controversial action the new county commissioners have taken is to file the County's chapter 9 bankruptcy case - an action which has been resisted by large segments of ...

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